browser no player
This is a flash animation.
browser no player
This is a flash animation that links to the website of each national park headquarter.
Home > TOPICS > Chasing the Forest Wisdom of Aborigines—Let the Hundred Year Ancient Path Forever Develop
TOPICS
tweet
PRINT_ICON
Print
MAIL_ICON
Mail to friend
Font:
Chasing the Forest Wisdom of Aborigines—Let the Hundred Year Ancient Path Forever Develop
Publish Date:2011-09-27
Aborigines are a group of race that has long resided in Taiwan before the Han Chinese immigrated here. The movie “Seediq Bale” describes the Japanese colonization era in 1930s. Dissatisfied with the repression of the Japanese and their “Ruling Indigene” Policy, Mona Rudao, tribal leader of Maheposhe Seediq tribe, leads his tribe to war in the “Wushe Incident.” Recently, this movie further induced a trend that led fans of the movie to step onto the aborigine path of which the Japanese troops had once conquered.
Behold a respect and grateful heart when following the path and indulging in the beauty of the forest
Behold a respect and grateful heart when
following the path and indulging in the
beauty of the forest.
The path of Taroko’s most famous Zhuilu Old Road is rocky but breathtakingly beautiful.
The path of Taroko’s most famous Zhuilu
Old Road is rocky but breathtakingly
beautiful.
The Aborigine Wisdom of Harmonious Cohabitation with the Forests

Since they were young, the aborigines have learned to use local resources to create traps for catching wild animals. When they hunt, they only hunt enough for the whole tribe to consume. This habit of not overhunting is the spirit behind “sustainable development” of cohabitation with nature.

The majority of Taiwanese aborigines have a deep and thick emotional tie with the mountains and forests. Legend has it that the people of Seediq Bales originated in the White Stone Mountain area of Zhongyang Mountain Ridge. The people of this tribe believe that they must cross the Rainbow Bridge after they die in order to return to the embrace of their ancestors. The Taya and Taroko tribe also have similar legends regarding the Rainbow Bridge. Living in the deep mountains, the Taroko tribe has another legend of Xilike Birds (White-eyed Nun Blabbler) and the hero that shot down the sun that has passed down from centuries. “Niao Bu Ji Xiong” (Using birds to determine the fate of good and bad) is still a tradition in the Taroko tribe today!

 

Promoting Eco-Travel to Experience the Beauty of Taroko

Most of Taiwan’s ancient paths were once the guarded paths built during the Japanese colonization era. Furthermore, these paths were originally main roads used by the aborigines to connect with many tribes. The Hehuan Mountain Cross-Ridge situated within the Taroko Park is the main path between the Seediq Bale tribe and the Taroko tribe. It is also an important path that intercrosses the east and west of Hualien. However, a part of this path has been covered by the Central Cross-Island Highway.

Caring for the aborigines is one of the most important promotion jobs of the park. Eco-travels thus allow visitors to be exposed to the aborigine culture and ecosystem education. The management department of the park has been actively promoting eco-travels while inviting energetic aborigines familiar with the mountains and forests to guiding visitors on their understanding of the ecosystem environment.
Lushui Trail (Image has been provided by the Taroko National Park)
Lushui Trail (Image has been provided
by the Taroko National Park)
Zhuilu Old Road(Image has been provided by the Taroko National Park)
Zhuilu Old Road (Image has been
provided by the Taroko National Park)

Establishing the Deep Experience between Man, Nature and Tribal Culture

Under the protection and maintenance of the Taroko National Park, the path that was once filled with military strategies has now become a beautiful trail between the mountains and forests. The aborigine culture behind it further reveals the respect and wisdom the tribe has for nature and life. The reverence and spirit of sustainable development of the aborigines can be said to be identical to the “Leave No Trace” spirit!
While visitors get to know the beliefs, habits and traditional culture of the aborigines again, why not learn how to depend on natural resources and the philosophy of life in treasuring resources.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last Updated on 2011-10-04
 
[ Back ]