Skip to Content

Nation Parks of Taiwan

::: Forward

:::

December 2008

Back to the index page
LEARNING EXPERIENCE

Glacier Remains Gracious Landscape - The Banff National Park, Canada

1 of 3
Lake Louise with reflection of the glacier landscape of Mount Sainte-Victoire is the most famous tourist spot in the RockiesAbundant life is the most attractive part of the Banff National Park.  In the picture is the mule deer with two big ears appearing by the road side without prewarningIn the picture is a goat trespassing Highway 93
“Banff is incredibly beautiful because it’s like a poem,” says Director Yi-ye Gao of the National Park Division in his sensitive opening. He points out why this national park is able to attract more than 3 million tourists each year (note 1.)
 
The Banff National Park in Alberta is the most symbolic national park in the Rockies connecting Jasper in the north and Yoho and Kootenay National Parks in the southwest. A worker discovered the hot spring cave while constructing the Pacific Railway in 1883. In 1885, the hot spring reserve was planned by the Canadian Government and then it became Canada’s first National Park.
 
A soothing and pleasant secret garden
Besides unparalleled special glacier landscapes, quiet natural views, rich flora and fauna ecology, the park is equipped with camping, picnicking, fishing, skiing, and rock climbing facilities. One can easily enter the park from Calgary in the west through Highway No. 1, from Jasper in the north through Icefield Highway or the Pacific Way and Trans-Canada Highway.
 
Tourists visit the park all year round. Bow River Valley Plain is abundant with water and foods and attracts lots of wild animals each winter for foods, habitats, or winter getaway. Driving about 25km north toward the Bow River Parkway, one arrives at Johnston Canyon where 7 waterfalls
were formed as a result of height differences of the canyon. Strolling on the mountain path, one feels the refreshing water sprays and hears the collision between water and the rock. “Tourists may find to their surprise that some wild tiny guests are enjoying the fun, too. Be careful not to feed them, though, to avoid tipping the ecological balance,” reminded Director Lin.
 
Lake Minnewanka is 24km long and 142m deep, the largest in the park. “Minnewanka” means “monster in the lake” in Indian language and hence the lake has long been connected to a secret water monster legend. The legend adds touching mystery to the sky blue lake. Appearance of any small animals can stir up wild imaginations.
 
Besides Director Lin, Timk Wang, a pack packer is also crazy about the park. Traveling by himself in the Rockies, Wang brought back latest real-time Banff images. He describes how Vermilion Lakes at the foot of Rundle Mountain got its name. A big lake about ten thousand years ago and now three small lakes separated by water bushes, the water source comes from overflowing snow water and spring water. This is way its name comes in the plural form. “The lakes are shallow with abundant light exposure and enriched with aquatic plants. Hence, a variety of animals make here their habitats, making it a must-come place for bird watchers.” Wang took quite a few pictures of the lakes, too.
Lake Minnewanka, which legend says lives the water monster, is the largest lake in the Banff National ParkVermilion Lakes was named so because it appears to be vermilion at sunsetGolden hamster by Lake Minnewanka
  • upper left: Lake Louise with reflection of the glacier landscape of Mount Sainte-Victoire is the most famous tourist spot in the Rockies. / by Timk Wang
  • upper center: Abundant life is the most attractive part of the Banff National Park. In the picture is the mule deer with two big ears appearing by the road side without prewarning. / by Timk Wang
  • upper rught: In the picture is a goat trespassing Highway 93 / by Timk Wang
  • lower left: Lake Minnewanka, which legend says lives the water monster, is the largest lake in the Banff National Park. / by Timk Wang
  • lower center: Golden hamster by Lake Minnewanka / by Timk Wang
  • lower right: Vermilion Lakes was named so because it appears to be vermilion at sunset / by Timk Wang

Interview & Text / Yong-wei Gao、Hsin-hua Lian
Photographer / Timk Wang
Translator / James Chang
Special thanks to / Director Yi-ye Lin, National Park Division、Prof. Hen-biao King of Society of Subtropical Ecology、Timk Wang

Back to the index page