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NP QUARTERLY

December 2008

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LEARNING EXPERIENCE

Glacier Remains Gracious Landscape - The Banff National Park, Canada

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The Fairmount Chateau Lake Louise is one of the representative hotels in the Rockies The flow rate of glaciers varies with different locations.  The surrounding speed is usually faster than the central one.  The difference in the rate results in the crevasse in the picture.  Official statistics say that the biggest crevasse is 365 meters deep Columbia Icefields between Banff and Jasper National Parks

Taking climate change seriously
Being tourists’ favorite, how should the Banff National Park strike a balance among human beings, primitive landscapes, and wild animals?
 
As the railway construction reached the Rockies in 1883, Banff Town other cultural institutions and art museums were established. Along with numerous traditional annual events, they made it difficult for wild animals to migrate and accordingly shattered their habitats.
 
In 1930, the Canadian National Park Law emphasizing environmental protection over development was passed. Despite the high population density in the town, it was regulated that except for employees of national parks, hotels, and shops, other people were not allowed to live for a long time and the height of buildings shall not be over that of trees to avoid blocking their growth. The color and specifications of houses were regulated, too. In early 1980, the park constructed 2 meters high grids along the freeway and 22 underground ecological corridors and two 50 meters wide sky bridges to greatly bring down deaths of animals from traffic accidents. In 1994, more measures were taken by the park headquarter to avoid interfering with animal migration.
 
Following the efforts, a new challenge for the park is climate change. The Columbia Icefields between Banff and Jasper National Parks, a world legacy from the Ice Age about 20

thousand years old, melted by around 1,364 meters between 1893 and 1953 and the melting speed picked up between 1948 and 1953 by 55 meters per year (Note 2). Glaciers in the Canadian Rockies retreated by 25% (Note 3) in the 20th century. “Not a general consensus yet, global warming had concerned the management committee of the park,”
 
A Pioneer in Ecological Preservation
Lin was impressed by the management and planning of the Canadian Government for its 4 national parks during a visit to Canada in 1999.
 
“Canada has perfect management plans. The ecological corridors alone already enabled park flora and fauna with a better environment. Despite the natural environment undermined by population growth, over development of resources, and the economy, Taiwan also has world legacies and hence should emphasize conservation like Canada.”
 
Lin suggests that ecological corridors should be planned for the Central Range, the Hsuehshan Range, and Coastal Range. Different sections in each Range can be included in the ecological corridors. Related conservation laws and management policies must be integrated. Research centers should be established and public participation should be with animal migration. encouraged to ensure flora and fauna with a safer habitat.
An early chained snocoach could only take 8 people. (See picture in the left)  However, in 1981, the 56-seat Snocoach was developedAn early chained snocoach could only take 8 people. (See picture in the left)  However, in 1981, the 56-seat Snocoach was developedThe special and safe ice field exclusive tire is the biggest feature of snowcoach
  • upper left: The Fairmount Chateau Lake Louise is one of the representative hotels in the Rockies / by Timk Wang
  • upper center: The flow rate of glaciers varies with different locations. The surrounding speed is usually faster than the central one. The difference in the rate results in the crevasse in the picture. Official statistics say that the biggest crevasse is 365 meters deep / by Timk Wang
  • upper rught: Columbia Icefields between Banff and Jasper National Parks / by Timk Wang
  • lower left & lower center: An early chained snocoach could only take 8 people. (See picture in the left) However, in 1981, the 56-seat Snocoach was developed. / by Timk Wang
  • lower right: The special and safe ice field exclusive tire is the biggest feature of snowcoach. / by Timk Wang
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