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NP QUARTERLY

December 2008

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COVER STORY

Climate Change Makes Seabirds Lost - A Report on Astray Seabirds in Wuling

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Wuling valley becomes the temporary shelter for lost sea birds.
During the fall of 2008, three typhoons made landfall in Taiwan back to back. The gust and flooding rain had not only threatened the safety of humans, but other “guests” here. And this impact can ultimately be imputed to climate changes again.
 
Some factors are needed to form typhoons: higher temperatures and high humidity for circulation to happen, plus significant wind shear that causes turbulence and convection.
Central Weather Bureau pointed out that due to climate change, the water temperature of west part of Pacific is still high in fall, and, with sufficient moisture, can cause powerful typhoons.
 
The storm rain and gust brought by Jangmi in late September had disturbed the migration of birds and resulted in a rare scene in Wuling area.
Dam No. 1 of Cijiawan River after a typhoon. Sterna fuscata to warm in the box.
The landslide of the narrow valley at Wuling caused by Typhoon Jangmi. A Calonectris leucomelas recuperating in the box.
  • upper: Wuling valley becomes the temporary shelter for lost sea birds./ by Yan-ling Chang
  • center left: Dam No. 1 of Cijiawan River after a typhoon./ by Yan-ling Chang
  • center right: Sterna fuscata to warm in the box./ by Yan-ling Chang
  • lower left: The landslide of the narrow valley at Wuling caused by Typhoon Jangmi./ by Yan-ling Chang
  • lower right: A Calonectris leucomelas recuperating in the box./ by Yan-ling Chang

Text & Photos/ Yan-ling Chang, contract docent of SPNP
Translator/ James Chang

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